Why hire a licensed and insured contractor? Action Painting Company :: Wood Graining ::

Jotaba Cherry Wood graining, better known as “faux bois”, is a timeless decorative finish that adds warmth and beauty to any space. It can be utilized in almost any style of décor from a mahogany gentlemen’s pub to a bleached oak beach house. When wood graining, “keep it real”. Choose surfaces that are realistically made of wood such as baseboards, moldings, panels, mantels, columns or tabletops.Base ColorBenjamin Moore Paint #2158-30Glaze Colors

(A) Benjamin Moore Paint #2111-10 (veining color) (B) Benjamin Moore Paint #2173-10 (C) Benjamin Moore Paint #2105-30How-To Instructions Prep 1: Before base coating, make sure your surface is in good condition. Patch holes and cracks with spackling paste, and wash any dirt from surface using a mild soap. Mask all windows, baseboards, and moldings using 2” painter’s tape. Evenly apply paint with roller. Base coat should always be a satin or semi-gloss latex finish. Two coats may be necessary depending on coverage. Let dry 24 hours. Prep 2: Before you faux, prepare your glaze/paint mixture(s). A 5:1 ratio (5 parts Faux Like A Pro glaze to 1 part paint) is highly recommended. This ratio will allow you time to work the finish and prevent it from drying too fast. Step 1: Dip fan overgrainer into glaze A, offloading excess onto a paper plate. Hold the fan overgrainer loosely, dragging your brush with a slight tremble as you move from top to bottom. You want to create long, wavy brush strokes resembling an underneath wood grain. Step 2: Dip a folded piece of burlap into glaze A, offloading excess onto a paper plate. Working from top to bottom, drag your burlap over the surface. Lightly overlap each stroke, varying your pressure to produce light and dark areas. Each stroke should be spaced 2-3” apart so that your surface now looks like alternating wavy and dragged lines. Step 3: Dip a long pointed brush or a squirrel hair swordliner into glaze A, offloading excess onto a paper plate. Drag your brush down the surface giving each stroke a slight tremble effect. Following the contours of the grain you created in step 1 will produce a much bolder grain. Let dry 24 hours. Step 4: Using a bristle brush, evenly apply glaze B in the direction of the wood grain. Work on one section at a time, brushing the horizontal sections first and then the vertical sections. Proceed to step 5 before covering entire surface.. Step 5: Drag through the wet glaze with your camel hair mottler in the direction of the wood grain. Make sure you hold the brush with steady pressure dragging from top to bottom. You want to create subtle, yet visible brush strokes. Wipe off the brush after each pass. Step 6: While the glaze is still wet, grasp the entire handle of a flogging brush and hit the surface with the heel of the bristles. Overlap each hit as you go from top to bottom. Your goal is to create little pores similar to those found in most hardwoods. Wipe off brush after each pass. Let dry 24 hrs. Step 7: Using a bristle block brush, evenly apply glaze C in the direction of the wood grain. Drag your brush through the wet glaze, removing most of the glaze while still maintaining subtle brush strokes. This last application will deepen your wood tone. Work on one section at a time, brushing horizontal sections first and then the vertical sections. Seal with two coats of varnish for protection.

Tip 1 Before you start your project, find a real piece of wood that works with your décor. Study your piece of wood and become familiar with its coloring and various grain patterns. Tip 2 The layout and movement of your grain should be decided ahead of time. Usually the center panel features most of the heart graining, while the outside perimeter is composed mostly of straight graining. Tip 3 When rendering your wood design always think about movement of the grain. Straight graining should be slightly wavy and heart graining should follow the contour of a mountain.